224. Documentation for John Frederick Fox
(Bef 1735 to Aft 17 Jan 1784 and Bef 04 Dec 1784)
father of Frederick Fox
(10 May 1751 to 27 Feb 1837)



Download Adobe Acrobat File - 224. John Frederick Fox - (The file has the following text plus images.)

The Fox Genealogy by Daniel Gebhart Fox - (scanned version of original book)

John Frederick Fox was born before 1735. This seems certain because his oldest son, Daniel, who is identified as such in the will of John Fox, was born before 1751.
(1) Another son of John Fox, Frederick, was born May 10, 1751.(2) Surely John Fox was more than fifteen or sixteen years old when he became the father of Daniel Fox.

Before coming to America, John Fox probably lived in Hesse-Cassel, Germany. According to Daniel Gebhart Fox, author of The Fox Genealogy which was compiled in 1914 and published in 1924, "Frederick Fox, 1, was born May 10, 1751, in Hesse-Cassel, Germany, (a former Electorate of Germany, now forming the district of Cassel in the Prussian Province of Hesse-Nassau)."
(3) There is, however, a statement in The History of Vermillion County, Indiana that indicates Frederick Fox was born at sea. "The father (i.e., George Fox) of our subject (i.e., John L. Fox) was a native of Maryland, and a son of Frederick Fox, who was born on the ocean while his parents were immigrating to America."(4)

Daniel Gebhart Fox gives the middle name of John Fox as Frederick.
(5) The sources D. G. Fox gives for the middle name of Frederick are: 1) "records of the port of Philadelphia, show that John Frederick Fox landed at the port" in 1752, and 2) "Mrs. Christiana (Fox) Allison, who was the surviving great-granddaughter of John Frederick Fox, stated to the writer during an interview about two years prior to her death, that 'the old man Fox's name was John Frederick'."(6)

The father of John Fox might have been named Daniel Fox, since John Fox named his oldest son Daniel. Frederick Fox, a son of John Fox, also named one of his sons
Daniel.(7)

Daniel G. Fox in the Fox Genealogy indicates John Fox and his family came to America in 1752. A John Fox appeared in the state house in Philadelphia the day of his arrival and "took and subscribed the usual Qualifications."
(8) There is no conclusive proof however that this John Fox was the father of Daniel and Frederick Fox mentioned above.

John Fox and his family may have settled for a period of time in the Pennsylvania German community before coming to Maryland. On the other hand, they might have settled at the location that became known as Fox's Gap shortly after arriving in Philadelphia. Many Germans followed the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road out of Pennsylvania and into Maryland and Virginia.

The gap in the South Mountain at which John Fox chose to settle, was on a wagon road known as the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road. The road also was known as the Road from Conestoga to Opequon, the Monocacy Road, the main road leading from Frederick Town to Sharpsburg, the Old Sharpsburg Road, the German Monocacy Road, and the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House.
(9)

Fox's Gap in Maryland lies about midway between Frederick and Hagerstown, Maryland, and about two miles from Boonsboro, Maryland. Sharpsburg, the site of the Battle of Antietam during the Civil War, lies approximately five miles west. Fox's Gap in Maryland was destined to become not only the home for John Fox and his family, but an historical landmark due to the events of the
Braddock Expedition of 1755 and the Battle of South Mountain, called the Battle of Boonsboro in the South, on September 14, 1862.(10) It is unknown if John Fox and his family resided at the gap when General Braddock, George Washington, and Maryland Governor Sharp passed through there on May 2, 1755. It is entirely possibly they did. We can only speculate if the reason or reasons John Fox chose to settle at Fox's Gap were similar or like-minded to those of the Confederate Army on September 13 and 14, 1862.

There is strong evidence the gap was named for John Fox by no later than the mid 1760s. The primary support for the arrival of the John Fox family at Fox's Gap by the mid 1760s is a land record for a tract named Grim's Fancy.
(11) Land tracts in Maryland in the 1600s and 1700s were given names. The Grim's Fancy land record states, "for and in the name of him the said Alexander Trim all that tract of land called Grims Fancy lying in the County aforesaid beginning at a bounded Black Oak tree standing on the north side of the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House on the West side of the South Mountain and running thence". The Grim's Fancy tract of land is approximately one-half mile west of Fox's Gap. For purposes of identifying the location of Fox's Gap, we consider the Reno Monument, dedicated to Union Major General Jesse Lee Reno who was killed there on September 14, 1862, as being at the heart of Fox's Gap.

There is no record for a tract of land owned by John Fox in the vicinity of Fox's Gap. Perhaps John Fox, coming from Germany, was not able to purchase land in Maryland and simply became a squatter at Fox's Gap. Frederick Fox, a son of John Fox, patented a tract of land that includes the areas of both Fox's Gap and Turner's Gap in the South Mountain, not far from Boonsboro.
(12) A tract named Friendship for 231 and 1/2 acres was the subject of an unpatented certificate, #228, on June 8, 1795. On May 9, 1797, Frederick Fox patented Addition to Friendship for 202 acres. The Reno Monument stands on the southern portion of Addition to Friendship.(13)

Frederick Fox was a farmer and perhaps a tavern keeper.(
14) He married Catherine Booker on March 1, 1773, probably at or near Middletown, Maryland.(15) Catherine was a daughter of Bartholomew Booker and Margaret.(16) She was born May 1, 1748.(17)

It does not seem viable to the author that the John Fox family could be any nationality other than German. Several historical records support this conclusion. First, upon the death of Catherine Fox, the wife of Frederick Fox, the death register of Zion Lutheran Church indicated "Catarin, wife of Friedrich Fuchs, bur. 4 Nov. 1800. Heb. 4:9."
(18) Fox is spelled Fuchs in this church record and is clearly a German spelling. Second, the services of this church were only held in the German language for many years. George Fox, the oldest son of Frederick Fox, was a member of this church, the Zion Lutheran Church of Middletown, Maryland.(19) Third, Zion Lutheran Church records indicate, "Samuel, son of Jacob and Magdelena Benner was born April 14, 1801. Baptised June 21, 1801. Sponsored by George Fox, a single person". (Mary) Magdelena Benner was a daughter of Frederick Fox and a sister of George Fox. Fourth, Daniel Gebhart Fox in The Fox Genealogy indicates Frederick Fox was born in Hesse-Cassel, Germany.

John Fox was a skin-dresser by trade.
(20) There is mention in his will, "that my Son Frederick shall have the Clocke and one half of the skin dressing tools used my son Michael is to have the Young Mare with the Other half of the Aforesaid tools and also my Wearing Apearel Except my fine fure hat which I leave to Frederick".(21) The Birely Tannery Report gives an excellent description of what the tannery business was like in the area surrounding Frederick, Maryland, in the 1700s.(22)

The name of John Fox may be found in the Moses Chapline Sr. Administration Account papers submitted by the executors of the estate, bearing a date of June 19, 1766.
(23) Moses Chapline Senior lived about two miles west of Fox's Gap towards Sharpsburg.(24)

Little is known of the wife of John Fox or if he might have had more than one wife during his lifetime. His will states, " First I give and Bequeath unto
my beloved Wife Christina all that I do possess of during her Natural life".(25) John Fox apparently married his first wife before they came to America. We cannot be certain his first and only wife was Christiana. The letter of Jacob Reel does seem to indicate or imply that Christiana Fox was the mother of Frederick and Michael Fox. Christiana Fox died August 6, 1812, probably in Sharpsburg, Maryland.(26)

John and Christina Fox apparently lived in Sharpsburg, Maryland, by the mid 1760s since we find a record of Lot #143 purchased August 23, 1766, by John Fox from Joseph Chapline.
(27) Joseph Chapline was the founder of Sharpsburg in 1763, having named the town after Maryland Governor Sharpe.(28)

We can only speculate that Frederick Fox continued to live at or near Fox's Gap, after his parents moved to Sharpsburg, due to the fact that Frederick patented the Addition to Friendship land tract at Fox's and Turner's gaps in 1795.
(29) The Fox Genealogy by Daniel Gebhart Fox indicates that Frederick Fox owned the Fox Inn at one time.(30) Daniel G. Fox identifies a land tract named Turkeyfoot, land records in Maryland were given names in the 1700s, where the Fox Inn stood. However, from analysis of land records by Curtis L. Older, the Fox Inn was owned by George Fox, oldest son of Frederick Fox, for a period of only a few years until all the Frederick Fox family clan moved to the area that became Miamisburg, Ohio, near present day Dayton, Ohio, in 1807.(31)

The Fox Inn is located about two miles from Fox's Gap towards Middletown, Maryland. Since Frederick Fox never owned the property and George Fox only owned the property for a few years up to 1807, it is somewhat mysterious why the property would continue to be known as the Fox Inn right up to present day in 2009. The only reason the building has been know for over 200 years as the Fox Inn might be that the old tavern or inn was the first place a traveler through Fox's Gap from the west might stay for the night after passing through Fox's Gap.

John Fox died in 1784. He wrote his will on January 17, 1784 and it was probated December 4, 1784, in Washington County, where Sharpsburg is located.
(32) Since John Fox died in 1784, you will not find him listed in the first United States census of 1790.

Christiana Fox died August 6, 1812, in Sharpsburg. The support for this date of death and location comes from a letter or copy of a letter that was in the possession of Robert H. Fox of Cincinnati, Ohio, in the late 1990s.
(33) The letter, from Jacob Reel of Sharpsburg to Michael and Frederick Fox of Franklin Township, Warren County, Ohio, about the death of their mother Christiana, was dated August 9, 1812, at Sharpsburg. The letter indicated that "we inform you that our aged Mother departed this life the 6th of Aug after a sickness of four weeks". Why he indicated "our aged Mother" is not known. There is no record of a Jacob Reel marrying a woman with the last name of Fox. Christina Fox was buried at the Lutheran Church lot in Sharpsburg, Maryland.(34)

Michael Fox, a brother of Frederick Fox, was born January 6, 1760, and died in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio, on August 23, 1837, aged 77 years, 7 months, and 17 days. He and his wife Susannah Fox, 1761 - 1836, are both buried in Woodhill Cemetery in Franklin, Warren County, Ohio. Michael and Susannah Fox were the parents of Elizabeth, Eve, Jacob, Daniel, and Michael.(35)

See
APPENDIX ONE for the full text of the will of John Fox; APPENDIX TWO has a list of the John Fox Land Records in Frederick County, Maryland; APPENDIX THREE has a list of the Christiana Fox Land Records in Washington County, Maryland; APPENDIX FOUR has the September 8, 1812, Letter from Jacob Reel of Sharpsburg, Maryland, to Frederick and Michael Fox of Warren County, Ohio; APPENDIX FIVE has a Map of The Road from Swearingen’s Ferry on the Potomac River through Sharpsburgh to the Top of the South Mountain at Fox’s Gap. August 23, 1792; APPENDIX SIX has an article on the Occupations of Residents along the Old Sharpsburg Road in the 1700s; and APPENDIX SEVEN discusses John Fox's House mentioned in the Grim's Fancy Land Record.

A Kodak Photo CD-Rom disc entitled “Fox’s Gap in Maryland” by Curtis L. Older contains photos of many documents and items related to the descendants of John Fox through his son Frederick Fox, as well as material related to Fox's Gap in Maryland, the Braddock Expedition, and the Battle of South Mountain. A copy of the CD-Rom is at the Washington County Free Library, Hagerstown, Maryland.

Children (
Fox) born in Frederick County, Maryland:(35)
i. Daniel, born before 1751, died after 1783
ii.
Frederick, born May 10, 1751, died Feb 27, 1837
iii.
Rachel, died after 1783
iv. Magdelin, died after 1783
v.
Unknown daughter, died before 1784
vii.
Michael, born January 6, 1760, died August 23, 1837


ORIGINAL SOURCE MATERIAL to support the RELATIONSHIP between
JOHN FOX and his son FREDERICK FOX


1) Will of John Fox, Court House, Washington County, Maryland, Book A, Liber 102, January 17, 1784. John Fox mentions his son Frederick four times in his will as well as his wife Christina, oldest son Daniel, son Michael, daughters Magdelin and Rachael, and two granddaughters, Elizabeth and Catherine ?Furtnay? or ?Fortney?. Michael, a younger brother of Frederick, preceded Frederick to Ohio. News from Fox's Gap, Issue 3, Volume 2, June 1, 2002, published by The Society of the Descendants of Frederick Fox of Fox's Gap in Maryland, "Michael Fox of Fox's Gap in Maryland" by Lois Ann Baker. Also see Issue 4, Volume 2, "Michael Fox, a brother of Frederick, and The Fox - Beard Connection in Ohio" by Lois Ann Baker.

2) The Fox Genealogy including Metherd, Benner and Leiter descendants, giving biographies of the first and second generations, with sketches of the third generation, compiled by D. G. Fox, 1914. (n.p.) 1924. 1 p. 1., (5)-172 p. 20 cm. 37-9439, CS71.F79, 1924. Appendix No. 1 states, “Mrs. Christiana (Fox) Allison who was the surviving great-granddaughter of John Frederick Fox, stated to the writer during an interview about two years prior to her death, that ‘the old man Fox's name was John Frederick’." The material in The Fox Genealogy was collected by the author, Daniel Gebhart Fox, about the year 1914 from members of the Fox family and from original source documents.

3) Obituary of John L. Fox, The Hoosier State newspaper, Newport, Indiana, Wednesday 11 January 1899, page 1, column 3. Names his parents as George Fox and Elizabeth (Link) Fox. Names a son as Daniel and names a grandfather as Frederick Fox of Maryland. He was buried in Highland township (Indiana). “He was the son of George and Elizabeth (Link) Fox. The father of our subject was a native of Maryland and a son of Frederick Fox, who was born on the ocean while his parents were emigrating to America. The Fox family first settled in Md., where they grand-father kept a tavern at the foot of Fox Mountain for many years.”

4) I. Daniel Rupp, Thirty-Thousand Names of Immigrants (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1971), 280-1. The name "Johan Friederich Fuchs" appears. “Johan Frederich Fuchs and his wife Christiana arrived at the port of Philadelphia on the ship Anderson, Captain Hugh Campbell, September 27, 1752. The date does not agree with the statement in the John L. Fox obituary that Frederick Fox was born on the ocean, but is within about 18 months of his birth date given in The Fox Genealogy. Also R. B. Strassburger and W. J. Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Lists of Arrivals (Norristown, Pa.: Pennsylvania German Society, 1934), 488-9. John Fox took the oath on arrival. The Rupp record certainly indicates there was a John Frederick Fox who arrived at Philadelphia in 1752 and who could very easily have followed the Great Philadelphia Wagon Road to what became Fox’s Gap.

5) History of Vermillion County, Indiana, Biographical and historical record of Vermillion County, Indiana, published 1888, page 491. The article indicates John L. Fox owned 331 acres of choice land at one time in Highland Township. He was farming 186 acres at the time the book was published in 1888. It lists his parents as George and Elizabeth (Link) Fox and his grandfather as Frederick Fox. The obituary certainly substantiates material in The Fox Genealogy by D. G. Fox.

6) Land record near Fox’s Gap in Maryland mentions John Fox’s house. Grim's Fancy, Maryland State Archives, BC & GS 40, p. 114, Alexander Trim's certificate of survey, examined and passed 5 June 1765, [MdHR 17,451, 1-23-4-5]. "On the North Side of the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House". The same information is contained on a Surname Card and a Land Plat Card in the The Arthur G. Tracey Collection in the Historical Society of Carroll County, Md., 210 East Main Street, Westminster, MD. 21157). The documents that the John Fox family was very near Fox’s Gap by at least June 1765. The Grim’s Fancy property appears to have been within at least a half mile of where the Reno Monument stands.

7) MdHR, 17,478, 1-23-4-34, Frederick Fox, patent for Addition to Friendship, May 27, 1805, 202 ac. Maryland State Archives, IC #P, 672-3. Frederick Fox was the first landowner of property where the Reno Monument stands at Fox’s Gap in Maryland. The property extended from Fox’s Gap along the Wood Road to Turner’s Gap. It an included about 80 acres at Turner’s Gap and about 80 acres at Fox’s Gap. Major fighting occurred at both Fox’s Gap and Turner’s Gap on this property at the Battle of South Mountain, September 14, 1862. The Reno Monument at Fox’s Gap and the Dahlgren Chapel at Turner’s Gap stand on this property. Addition to Friendship was a resurvey obtained by Frederick Fox out of the western shore land office by a special warrant of proclamation “to resurvey and affect the vacancy included in a resurvey made for him on the eighth day of June seventeen hundred and ninety five by the name of Friendship, the caution money for which had not been paid within the time limited by law. In pursuance whereof, a resurvey was made and a certificate thereof returned containing two hundred and two acres lying in the county aforesaid and called Addition to Friendship.”

8) The Moses Chapline Senior Administration Account papers submitted by the executors of the estate, bearing a date of Jun 19, 1766, mention the name of John Fox. See
Frederick County, Maryland, The Account of Joseph and Jennett Chapline, executors of Moses Chapline, late of Frederick County deceased.

9) Letter from Jacob Reel to Michael and Frederick Fox, dated at Sharpsburg, Aug. 9, 1812, from a copy obtained from Robert H. Fox of Cincinnati, Ohio. "The following letter received and forwarded from Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, Sept. 8, 1812, addressed to Msrs. Fredric(k) & Michael Fox, Franklin Township, Warren Co. Ohio". The letter informs Frederick and Michael of the death of their mother, Christina Fox. A copy of this letter is included in a CD-rom entitled Fox’s Gap in Maryland at the Frederick County Historical Society in Frederick, Maryland. Jacob Reel mentions Christina Fox twice in his will regarding a lot in Sharpsburg that he purchased from her.

10) A map of The Road from Swearingen’s Ferry on the Potomac River through Sharpsburgh to the Top of the South Mountain at Fox’s Gap was recorded on August 23, 1792, and is in the Maryland State Archives at Annapolis, Maryland. Maryland State Archives, Special Collections (MSA Map Collection) 507 "Road from Swearingen's Ferry on the Potomac River through Sharpsburg to the top of the South Mountain at Fox's Gap." August 23, 1792. [MSA G1427-507, B5-1-3]. Maryland Bicentennial Commission and Maryland Historical Society Marker. Swearingen's Ferry and Pack Horse Ford. This marker is at the Rumsey Bridge on the Potomac River at Shepherdstown. State Roads Commission Marker. General Edward Braddock. This marker is on the square in Sharpsburg, Maryland.

11) A history of the roads through Fox’s Gap and Turner’s Gap is included in the two following books by Curtis L. Older: The Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain (Westminster, Md.: Heritage Books, 1999) and The Braddock Expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland, (Westminster, Md: Heritage Books, 1995). Both books contain extensive material about Fox’s Gap and Turner’s Gap which are not far from Boonsboro, Maryland.


REFERENCES

1. Will of John Fox, Court House, Washington County, Maryland, Book A, Liber 102, January 17, 1784. See APPENDIX ONE for the full text of the will of John Fox.

2. The Fox Genealogy including Metherd, Benner and Leiter descendants, giving biographies of the first and second generations, with sketches of the third generation, compiled by D. G. Fox, 1914. (n.p.) 1924 . 1 p. 1., (5)-172 p. 20 cm. 37-9439, CS71.F79, 1924, page 12; tombstone of Frederick Fox, Gebhart or St. John Cemetery, Miamisburg, Ohio.

3. Fox Genealogy, page 12.

4. History of Vermillion County, Indiana, page 491.

5. I. Daniel Rupp, Thirty-Thousand Names of Immigrants (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1971), 280-1.

6.
Fox Genealogy, page 169, APPENDIX NO. 1.

7. Will of Frederick Fox, Will Book C, case #1444, Montgomery County, Ohio;; tombstone of Daniel Booker Fox, Gebhart or St. John Cemetery, Miamisburg, Ohio; Fox Genealogy, pages 101 through 103.

8. I. Daniel Rupp, Thirty-Thousand Names of Immigrants (Baltimore: Genealogical Publishing Co., 1971), 280-1. The name "Johan Friederich Fuchs" appears; also R. B. Strassburger and W. J. Hinke, Pennsylvania German Pioneers, Lists of Arrivals (Norristown, Pa.: Pennsylvania German Society, 1934), 488-9. John Fox took the oath on arrival.

9. Curtis L. Older, The Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain (Westminster, Md.: Heritage Books, 1999), pages 41-42; The Braddock Expedition and Fox's Gap in Maryland, (Westminster, Md: Heritage Books, 1995) pages 78-104.

10. Braddock Expedition, Introduction and Afterword.

11. Grim's Fancy, Maryland State Archives, BC & GS 40, p. 114, Alexander Trim's certificate of survey, examined and passed 5 June 1765, [MdHR 17,451, 1-23-4-5]. "On the North Side of the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House".

12. MdHR, 17,478, 1-23-4-34, Frederick Fox, patent for Addition to Friendship, May 27, 1805, 202 ac. Maryland State Archives, IC #P, 672-3.


13. Braddock Expedition, pages 103 and 189-190; also Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain, pages 206-210.

14. FCLR, WR-19-206, Mortgage from Christian Benner to Frederick Fox, recorded April 11, 1799, Shaffs Purchase and Mount Sinai. "Between Christian Benner Sen. of Frederick County farmer of the one part; and Frederick Fox of the same county farmer of the other part."; Lemoine Cree, A Brief History of the South Mountain House (Boonsboro, Md.: Dodson, 1963); Ohio D.A.R. Soldiers Rosters, 2 Vols., 1:146; Fox Genealogy, pp. 13-14.

15. Fox Genealogy, page 12; will of Bartholomew Booker, Frederick County, Maryland, Register of Wills Records, GM-2-431; will of Margaret Book (Booker) Frederick County, Maryland, Register of Wills Records GM-3-126.

16.
Frederick S. Weiser, ed., Maryland German Church Records Vol. 2, Zion Lutheran Church 1781-1826 (Manchester, Md.: Noodle-Doosey Press, 1987), 77. The Death Register of Zion Lutheran Church indicates "Catarin, wife of Friedrich Fuchs, bur. 4 Nov. 1800. Heb. 4:9."; Fox Genealogy, page 12; will of Bartholomew Booker; will of Margaret Book (Booker).

17.
Fox Genealogy, page 12.

18. Frederick S. Weiser, ed., Maryland German Church Records Vol. 2, Zion Lutheran Church 1781-1826 (Manchester, Md.: Noodle-Doosey Press, 1987), 77. The Death Register of Zion Lutheran Church indicates "Catarin, wife of Friedrich Fuchs, bur. 4 Nov. 1800. Heb. 4:9."; Fox Genealogy, p. 12.

19. Frederick S. Weiser, ed., Zion Lutheran Church 1781-1826, Maryland German Church Records, Vol. 2, (Manchester, Md.: Noodle-Doosey Press, 1987), 25; "Samuel, son of Jacob and Magdelena Benner was born April 14, 1801. Baptised June 21, 1801. Sponsored by George Fox, a single person". (Mary) Magdelena Benner was a daughter of Frederick Fox and sister of George Fox.

20. Will of John Fox; Fox Genealogy, page 12.

21. Ibid.

22. See The Birely Tannery Report, held by the Frederick, Maryland, library, a report on the tannery business in and about Frederick, Maryland. The Birely Tannery began operation in Frederick, Maryland, in the 1760s and remained in business until the 1920s. Archaeological Data Recover at the Birely Tannery (18FR575) City of Frederick, Maryland, prepared by M.A.A.R. Associates, Inc. of Newark, Delaware, 1991.

23. The Moses Chapline Senior Administration Account papers submitted by the executors of the estate, bearing a date of Jun 19, 1766, mention the name of John Fox. See Frederick County, Maryland, The Account of Joseph and Jennett Chapline, executors of Moses Chapline, late of Frederick County deceased.

24. Braddock Expedition, pages 76-77, 79-80, 86, 123-124; Land Tracts of the Battlefield of South Mountain, pages 42 and 226. See page 226 of the Land Tracts book for a discussion of The Moses Chapline Senior Cemetery and references to other material on the subject.

25. Will of John Fox.

26. Letter from Jacob Reel to Michael and Frederick Fox, dated at Sharpsburg, Aug. 9, 1812, from a copy obtained from Robert H. Fox of Cincinnati, Ohio. "The following letter received and forwarded from Lebanon, Warren County, Ohio, Sept. 8, 1812, addressed to Msrs. Fredric(k) & Michael Fox, Franklin Township, Warren Co. Ohio"; Fox Genealogy, page 12.

27. Frederick County, Maryland, land records, to John Fox, K-703, August 23, 1766, from Joseph Chapline, Lot #143, Sharpsburg.

28.
Aubrey C. Land, The Dulanys of Maryland (Baltimore: Maryland Historical Society, 1955), 180. Braddock Expedition, page 4; Fox Genealogy, page 12.

29. Arthur G. Tracey Collection, The Historical Society of Carroll County, Maryland, 210 East Main Street, Westminster, Maryland, Friendship, 231 and 1/2 acres, June 8, 1795, unpatented certificate #228; Maryland State Archives, IC #P 672-3, May 9, 1797, Frederick Fox, Addition to Friendship, 202 acres; Land Tracts, page 210. Addition to Friendship was a resurvey obtained by Frederick Fox out of the western shore land office by a special warrant of proclamation to resurvey and affect the vacancy included in a resurvey made for him on the eight day of June seventeen hundred and ninety five by the name of Friendship, the caution money for which had not been paid within the time limited by law. In pursuance whereof, a resurvey was made and a certificate thereof returned containing two hundred and two acres lying in the county aforesaid and called Addition to Friendship.

30. Fox Genealogy, page 13.

31. Braddock Expedition, Appendix D, pages 200-205; Land Tracts, pages 211-213.

32. Will of John Fox.

33. Letter from Jacob Reel to Michael and Frederick Fox, dated at Sharpsburg, August 9, 1812; Fox Genealogy, page 12.

34.
Fox Genealogy, page 12.

35.
News from Fox's Gap, Issue 3, Volume 2, June 1, 2002, published by The Society of the Descendants of Frederick Fox of Fox's Gap in Maryland, "Michael Fox of Fox's Gap in Maryland" by Lois Ann Baker. Also see Issue 4, Volume 2, "Michael Fox, a brother of Frederick, and The Fox - Beard Connection in Ohio" by Lois Ann Baker.


APPENDIX ONE

will of John Fox

Book A Liber 102, will of John Fox, January 17, 1784
Washington County, Maryland (probated December 4, 1784)


In the name of God Amen I John Fox of Sharpsburg Washington County and State of Maryland being very sick and weak in body but of perfect mind and memory thanks be given to God calling to mind the mortality of my body and knowing that it is appointed for all men once to die do make and ordain this my last Will and Testament, that is to say principally & first of all I give and Recommend my Soul unto the Earth to be buried in decent Christian burial at the discretion of my Executors nothing doubting but at the General Resurrection I shall receive the same again by the Almighty power of God. And as touching such worldly Estate as it has pleased God to bless me with in this life. I give devise and dispose of the same in the following manner and form.

First I give and bequeath unto
my beloved Wife Christina all that I do possess of during her Natural life and at her Death it is well that my Son Frederick shall have the Clock and one half of the skin-dressing tools used.

My son Michael is to have the Young Mare with the Other half of the Aforesaid tools and also my Wearing Apparel Except my fine fur hat which I leave to Frederick, and the remaining and Residue of my Estate I leave and bequeath unto my Children and Grand Children viz. as follows, Frederick, Magdelin & Michael is to have three fourth of it divided Equally amongst them and the remaining fourth part I give and Bequeath unto my live Grand Children, Elizabeth & Catherine Furtnay (?Fortney?), and also I leave and bequeath unto my Oldest Son Daniel and my Daughter Rachel five shillings each to be paid when demanded And also I Constitute and appoint my Wife Christina and my Son Frederick to be the Executors of this my last Will and Testament and I do hereby utterly disallow revoke and dis(?) all and every Other Testaments Wills Legacies bequests and Executors by me in any wise before named Willed and bequeathed Ratifying and Confirming this and no other to be my last Will and Testament

In Witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and seal this 17 day of January in the Year of our Lord Seventeen Hundred & Eighty Four.

Signed Sealed published & delivered before John X Fox (seal)
the Said John Fox as his last Will and his mark
Testament in the presence of us who in his
presence and in the presence of each other
have hereto subscribed our names

Peter Dick Mathias Coons Christopher Cruse



APPENDIX TWO


John Fox Land Records in Frederick County


(Note: Washington County was formed on October 1, 1776 by the splitting of Frederick County.)


Ref Date From Other party Name of Tract/Item
No. or To
K-703 Aug. 23, 1766 From Joseph Chapline Lot #143, Sharpsburg
K-1231 May 12, 1767 From Joseph Chapline Lot #16, Sharpsburg
J-1400 Aug. 18, 1767 From John Barroughs Judgement*
K-1278 June 2, 1769 From Henry Joel Lot #7, Sharpsburg
K-1279 June 2, 1769 From Henry Joel 1/2 Lot #6, Sharpsburg

Probably not John Fox of Fox’s Gap in Maryland:
J-504 June 2, 1764 From Daniel Dulany Lot #269, Frederick Town*
K-499 May 22, 1766 To Elias Bruner Lot #269, Frederick Town*

* It is the author's opinion Lot #269 was bought and sold by a John Fox other than the father of Frederick Fox. It is not known which John Fox was the one in the Judgement record. It is the author's opinion all of the Sharpsburg lots above were owned by John Fox, the father of Frederick Fox.




APPENDIX THREE

Christiana Fox Land Records in Washington County, Maryland

Reference Date From Other Party Name of Tract/Other
No. or To
G-754 1792 From Joseph Shock Lot #145, Jerusalem Town
WR-11-414 3-26-1793 n/a Various Boundaries of Spring Garden*
WR-22-418 5-31-1802 To John Harmon Spring Garden*
P-581 1804 To Peter Crise 1/2 Lot #145, Sharpsburg
P-583 1804 To Jacob Reel 1/2 Lot #145, Sharpsburg

*It is the author's opinion the Spring Garden tract was owned by a Christiana Fox other than the mother of Frederick Fox. This Christiana Fox was the widow of Adam Morningstar and married a John Fox after the death of her first husband.





APPENDIX FOUR

Letter from Jacob Reel of Sharpsburg to Frederick and Michael Fox of Ohio

A copy of the following letter from Jacob Reel of Sharpsburg to Michael and Frederick Fox about the death of their mother Christiana was obtained from Robert H. Fox of Cincinnati, Ohio:

Received and forwarded from Lebanon. Warren Co. Ohio Sept. 8, 1812. Addressed to Msrs. Fredric & Michael Fox, Franklin Township Warren Co. Ohio.

Sharpsburg Aug 9 1812.
Dear. Brothers and Sisters by these few lines we let you know that we are in considerable good state of health at the present time. Thanks be to God for all his blessings. But we inform you that our aged Mother departed this life the 6th of Aug after a sickness of four weeks and was decently buried on the 7th and hope she is now at her rest. We had a physician who attended her regular. She did not complain of very severe pains in the time of her sickness. We suppose on account of her much sleeping. Mr. Widmeyer and wife were down to see her in time of her sickness and gave advice in some cases it seemed to give her some relief but according to the decree of God "dust thou art to dust return" stands good against all of the human family to which period we all hasten as fast as the wheels of time can carry us and may it please the Great Author our being to grant and give us all that true wisdom from above that we may consider our in most soul to meet the great Redeemer of Mankind who is the great Judge of quick and dead therefore let us all seriously and with good earnest consider the great importance of these things to our souls salvation. So we conclude by remembering our love and esteem for you all Yours Truly. Jacob Reel.

Jacob Reel died in 1844 in Sharpsburg. His Will is found in ?, pages 547-552, in Washington County Records. He mentions Christiana Fox twice in his Will, both times in reference to the 1/2 of Lot #6 in Sharpsburg which he purchased from her. He gives his wife's name in the Will as Elizabeth. On an 1877 Map of Sharpsburg, 1/2 of Lot #6 was owned by a D. Reel. Although this property was left by Jacob Reel to his daughter, ? ? , it could have come into the hands of one of his sons, David Reel.

"Item. To my daughter Nancy Michael, Wife of Adam Michael, I give and devise the half lot and premises in the town of Sharpsburg Washington County Maryland adjoining Crise and Beard and which was purchased of Christina Fox etc."

"To my beloved Wife Elizabeth I give, bequeath and devise for and during her natural life the following property viz. half a lot of ground in the town of Sharpsburg Washington County Maryland adjoining Crise and Beard which was purchased of Christian Fox, also the house and lot on which I now live situate in the said town of Sharpsburg and which I purchased from Jacob Houser etc."


APPENDIX FIVE

The Road from Swearingen's Ferry to Fox's Gap

A map of The Road from Swearingen’s Ferry on the Potomac River through Sharpsburgh
to the Top of the South Mountain at Fox’s Gap was recorded on August 23, 1792, and is in the
Maryland State Archives at Annapolis, Maryland.

Maryland State Archives, Special Collections (MSA Map Collection) 507 "Road from Swearingen's Ferry on the Potomac River through Sharpsburg to the top of the South Mountain at Fox's Gap." August 23, 1792. [MSA G1427-507, B5-1-3]

The old road shown by plain lines and is the distance of 11 1/4 miles - 56 perches
The alternations made by the commissioners is shown by dotted lines, and the road by them laid out is represented by lines numbered from 1 to 41 Difference 71 perches.

Note: The courses and boundaries above mentioned are to be taken for the middle of the road.

Washington County Sect.
By virtue of dower invested in an act of the assembly for the purpose we hereby certify that we laid out the road from Swearingen's Ferry on Potomac River through Sharpsburg to the top of the South Mountain in Fox's Gap agreeable to the courses and distances above expressed = As witness our hands and seals this 13th day of August 1792.
William Good (seal)
Jacob (seal)
Christopher (seal)
Beginning at the bank of the Potomac River at the said Ferry and running:

Crse North Degrees Length
No. South East or West

1 N 80 East 12 perches opposite the ferry house
2 S 49 East 56 ps to a post
3 S 62 East 62 ps to a post
4 N 44 East 43 ps to a marked poplar
5 N 62 East 264 ps to a marked white oak sapling
6 N 41 1/2 East 360 ps to a bounded white oak tree
7 N 69 1/2 East 320 ps to
the square in Sharpsburg - still continuing the course
8 N 69 1/2 East 110 ps to a post
9 N 60 East 64 ps to a marked locust sapling
10 N 69 1/2 East 112 ps to a marked hickory sapling
11 S 76 East 20 ps to a marked white oak tree
12 N 65 East 84 ps to a marked apple tree
13 N 85 East 16 ps
14 S 54 East 14 ps
to Orendorff's Bridge
15 S 77 East 8 ps
16 N 19 East 23 ps
17 N 3 West 26 ps to a bounded black oak
18 N 73 East 40 ps to a post
19 S 85 East 76 ps to a bounded Spanish oak
20 S 88 East 68 ps to a post
21 N 58 East 260 ps to a bounded black oak sapling
22 N 16 East 74 ps to a post
23 N 35 East 54 ps to a marked red oak & locust sapling
24 S 73 East 72 ps to a post
25 N 83 1/2 East 120 ps to a walnut tree
at Conrad Snavely's house
26 S 89 1/2 East 161 ps to a bounded black oak sapling
27 S 66 1/2 East 170 ps to a post near a marked black oak sapling
28 S 74 East 71 ps to a post
29 S 85 East 84 ps to a post
30 N 69 East 62 ps to a post
31 E - - - - - - - 324 perches to intersect
the old road near top of Domer's Hill
32 S 69 1/2 East 30 ps along the old road
33 N 83 East 20 ps
34 S 86 1/2 East 54 ps
35 S 28 East 20 ps
36 S 84 East 50 ps
37 N 77 East 22 ps
38 N 5 1/2 East 44 ps
39 [
estimate - not given on the map - South 81 East 40-45 ps]
40 S 44 East 70 ps
41 N 60 East 41 perches
to a stone set up in the road on the top of the mountain at the county line.

Two drawings of the road appear on this map, representing two measurement scales. The uppermost drawing is shown with the following indication: Scale 100P. The lower drawing is shown with the following indication: Scale 1/62,500 topographical map size.
The map identifies the following points along the road: Swearingen's Ferry on the Potomac River (starting point); the square in Sharpsburg (end of line 7); Orendorff's Bridge over the Antietam (end of line 15); Smith's shop (end of line 20); Jacob Russell (end of line 21); top of Red Hill (end of line 23); Conrad Snavely (end of line 25); Samuel Baker's (end of line 26); old road near top of Tomer's (or Domer's) Hill (line 31); Andrew Bash (end of line 36); top of the South Mountain at Fox's Gap (end of line 41)

[
Note: There is no course number 39 indicated on this map. The author believes this missing line in the written description of the road should be South, about 81 Degrees East, about 40 to 45 perches.]


APPENDIX SIX


Occupations of Residents
along the Old Sharpsburg Road in the 1700s

by Curtis Lynn Older


Land tract records provide valuable information about the owners of property along the Old Sharpsburg Road in the 1700s. A review of these records provides us with the occupations of numerous residents along or near the road. Although most of the individuals living along the road in the 1700s probably made their living as farmers, many also worked, at least part time, in various skilled trades.

The various crafts practiced along the Old Sharpsburg Road imply there were enough travelers on the road to support these trades. The route must have been an important thoroughfare. The economy along the road was vibrant. The following review identifies the land tracts along or near the Old Sharpsburg Road from Shepherdstown, Virginia, to Middletown, Maryland, that give the occupation of the tract owner. The discussion attempts to use the chronological date, in the opinion of the author, that someone first occupied the various properties.

James Smith patented
Smith’s Hills for 208 acres on 17 April 1745 [MdHR 17,396, 1-23-2-30, PT 1, pp. 261-263] [MdHR = Maryland Hall of Records in Annapolis]. The tract had its “beginning at a bounded white oak standing on the side of a hill within a quarter of a mile of the Waggon road that crosses Anteatom”. The Smith’s Hills tract was not far from the Burnside Bridge on the south side of the Battlefield of Antietam. The patent states “. . . the certificate of survey aforesaid and the land & premises therein mentioned unto a certain James Smith of Prince Georges County planter . . .” Today the tract is in Washington County. Washington County was part of Frederick County until 1776. Frederick County was part of Prince Georges County until 1749.

A tract named
Shettle was in the area of the present town of Bolivar, about one mile northeast of Fox’s Gap. Daniel Dulany Esquire patented the tract on 9 September 1742 for 50 acres [MdHR 17,408, 1-23-3-1, Y & S, p. 105]. “. . . that I Daniel Dulany within named in consideration of thirty one pounds fifteen shillings and six pence current money secured to be paid to me by Robert Marks of Frederick County Shomaker have assigned and transferrd and hereby assigns set over and transfer unto him the said Robert Marks the land within mentioned . . .” Robert Marks probably was one of the earliest settlers within a mile or so of what became Fox’s Gap. Traffic along the route of the Old Sharpsburg Road apparently justified the presence of a shoemaker by about 1742.

One of the most significant early deeds identifies Richard Smith as an Innholder.
Christios (Christies) Folly was northeast of the Fox Inn. Court records identify Richard Smith as living on the Great Road to Conococheague. See the Newsletter of December 1, 1996, page 13, for a discussion of the Great Road to Conococheague. “. . . between Richd Smith of Frederick County in the Province of Maryland Innholder of the one part & Peter Beaver of the same county & province aforesaid of the other part . . . for and in consideration of the sum of forty six pounds current money . . . “ [FCLR, E-753, Part of Christios Folly, Richard Smith to Peter Beaver, recorded 19 June 1755] [FCLR = Frederick County Land Records at Frederick, Maryland]. The year 1755 is the earliest point in time at which we can identify an innkeeper along the Old Sharpsburg Road between Shepherdstown and Middletown. Perhaps the presence of an inn was the best indicator of numerous travelers along the road.

Many craftsmen owned tracts along the Old Sharpsburg Road by 1770. Another important tract owner was Casper Shaaf, a merchant. Casper acquired The Exchange tract on which the Fox Inn stands. Casper made a resurvey on The Exchange tract. “. . . between
Casper Shaaf of Frederick County and Province of Maryland Merchant of the one part and Conrad Young of said County and Province farmer of the other part witnesseth that the said Casper Shaaf for and in consideration of the sum of forty pounds current money of Maryland . . .” [FCLR, E-1026, Resurvey on Exchange, Casper Schaff to Conrad Young, 125 acres, recorded 18 March 1756].

Grim’s Fancy was one half mile west of Fox’s Gap and along the Old Sharpsburg Road. The record for this tract is important in the history of Fox’s Gap. It identifies John Fox’s house and the Road from Swearingen’s Ferry to Frederick Town [FCLR, S-389, Grim’s Fancy, Philip Booker from George Common, recorded 28 June 1773]. “. . . between Philip Booker of Fredk County and province of Maryland Farmer of the one part and Geo. Common of said County and province Black Smith of the other part . . .”

John Fox settled at Fox’s Gap by no later than 1760. No land records for him exist, except for tracts in Sharpsburg. Perhaps John Fox was a squatter and never owned land at Fox’s Gap. The will of John Fox indicates he owned skin dressing tools [Will of John Fox, Book A, Liber 102, Washington County, Maryland, 17 January 1784]. Daniel Gebhart Fox, in The Fox Genealogy, describes John Fox as a tanner by trade. The house of John Fox must have been near the site of the Reno Monument at Fox’s Gap. The parcel of land on which the Reno Monument stands was part of a tract named Addition to Friendship that was patented by Frederick Fox.

The Birely Tannery Report may be of interest to those who seek additional information about the tannery craft of John Fox [Archaeological Data Recovery at the Birely Tannery (18FR575) City of Frederick, Maryland, prepared by M.A.A.R. Associates, Inc. of Newark, Delaware, 1991]. The Birely Tannery began operation in Frederick, Maryland, in the 1760s and remained in business until the 1920s! I was fortunate to learn of the report when I met Mr. Domenic A. Saguto, Master Shoemaker, at Williamsburg, Virginia. Mr. Saguto assisted in the preparation of the report, a copy of which I was able to purchase from the publisher.

A tract named
Boble (Bubble) was just south of the Fox Inn and the Exchange tract acquired by Casper Shaaf. A transfer in 1761 between Casper Shaaf and Michael Jesserang identifies Jesserang as an Innholder [FCLR, G-17, Boble (Bubble), Michael Jesserang to Casper Schaaf, recorded 4 June 1761]. “. . . made this fifth day of May in the year of our lord one thousand seven hundred and sixty one between Michael Jesserang of Frederick Town in Frederick County and province of Maryland Innholder of the one part and Casper Shaff of same place merchant of the other part . . . in consideration of the sum of fourteen pounds ten shillings current money of Maryland . . .”

A tract named the
Resurvey on Chestnut Hill identified Matthias Ringer as a farmer and Casper Shaaf as a merchant [FCLR, K-758, Resurvey on Chestnut Hill, Matthias Ringer to Casper Shaaf, recorded 2 October 1766]. “. . . between Matthias Ringer of Frederick County and province of Maryland farmer of the one part and Casper Shaaff of the same place merchant of the other part witnesseth that the said Matthias Ringer for and in consideration of the sum of twenty pounds current money of Maryland . . .” The Resurvey on Chestnut Hill tract is about a mile south of the Fox Inn and along the road to Burkittsville and Crampton’s Gap.

The
Resurvey on Whiskey Alley tract was north of Middletown and near the fork of the Old Hagerstown Road and the Old Sharpsburg Road at the Catoctin Creek [FCLR, L-588, Resurvey on Whiskey Alley, Philip Keywaughver to Nicholas Fink, recorded 28 November 1760]. “. . . between Philip Keywaughver of Frederick County and province of Maryland Farmer of the one part and Nicholas Finck of the county and province aforesaid Taylor of the other . . . for and in consideration of the sum of eighteen pounds current money . . . “

The Resurvey on Learning tract was south of the Fox Inn. A small portion of the tract came up near the old Sharpsburg Road east of the Fox Inn. Henry Lighter (Leiter) was a wheelwright. He purchased part of the Resurvey on Learning tract. A daughter of Frederick Fox married a son of Henry Lighter (Leiter) [FCLR, M-675, Resurvey on Learning, Henry Lighter to Peter Beaver, recorded 12 December 1769]. “. . . between Henry Lighter of Hamshire County in the Province of Virginia wheelwright of the one part and Peter Beaver of the same county and province aforesaid farmer of the other part . . .”

The
Goose Cap tract was at the fork of the old Hagerstown and old Sharpsburg Roads at the Catoctin Creek, about one mile north of Middletown [FCLR, O-540, Goose Cap, Nicholas Fink to Thomas Welch, recorded 2 September 1771] “. . . between Nichs Fink of Frederick County in the province of Maryland Taylor of the one part & Ths Welch of same county & province aforesaid Surveyor of the other part . . . for and in consideration of the sum of ninety nine pounds current & lawful money of Maryland . . .”

Shaaff’s Purchase was immediately west of the Fox Inn tract [FCLR, O-112, Shaaff's Purchase, Casper Shaaf to Peter Ruble, recorded 26 March 1771] “. . . between Casper Shaaf of Frederick Town in Frederick County and province of Maryland of the one part and Peter Ruble of Frederick County and province aforesaid Clocksmith of the other part witnesseth . . .”

The
Bray-face tract was northeast of the Fox Inn [FCLR, WR-4-531, Bray-face, recorded 25 May 1784]. “. . . between Peter Beaver of Frederick County and State of Maryland Farmer of the one part: and Christian Kyser of the same county and state aforesaid Miller of the other Part . . . All that tract or parcel of land called Bray-face, which being part of the Resurvey on Oxford. Beginning at the bounded tree of said Brayface, one of the original tracts, and runing thence . . .”

The review of the preceding land records indicates the people living along the Old Sharpsburg Road in the 1700s were industrious and free-market oriented. It seems evident why there were able to unite in a common cause to oppose the British by the mid 1770s.


APPENDIX SEVEN


John Fox's House mentioned in Land Records

The following information is contained on a Surname Card and a Land Plat Card in the The Arthur G. Tracey Collection in the Historical Society of Carroll County, Md., 210 East Main Street, Westminster, MD. 21157)

Surname Card:

Fox, John
2-27-1764 Grims Fancy - 50 A. - CFW: u-40
Near John Fox's House


Land Plat Card:

OFW: u-40 Wash. Co.
GRIMS FANCY
2-27-1764 50 A.
6-12-1769 Alexander Grim
BC & GS 40-114
N.S. Main Road that leads from Fredericktown to Swainingens (Swearingens) Ferry & near to John Fox's house.
On the west side of South Mtn.
On this land is 2 log cabbins 27 x 12 & 14 x 12 & 15 A. cultivated land.
Next to Mt. Atlas.
Wash. Co. near Foxes Gap.
F. C. 1743 Sheet 392

[
Note: Name spelled Trim in deeds, not Grim. This tract is located where the name Andrew Bash is found on the 1792 map of the road from Foxes Gap to Swearingens Ferry. This tract was subsequently owned by Michael Bash, probably having inherited it from Andrew Bash, who might have been his father. Michael Bash and his wife Catharine sold the property to Mathias Hutzel and Jacob Hutzel on May 8, 1813. This deed is recorded in Book Y, pages 723-725, Washington County Land Records.]


The Grims Fancy Land Record in the Maryland Archives

"On the North Side of the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House"

Grim's Fancy, BC & GS 40, p. 114, Alexander Trim's certificate of survey, examined and passed 5 June 1765, [MdHR 17,451, 1-23-4-5].

Alexander Trim's Cert. 50a Grims Fancy } Frederick County ? By virtue of a
Pattd 12th June 1769 Rent ? annum} Special Warrant granted out of his Lordships
2/. ? Chd to the Rent Roll }Land Office of this Province to Alexander Trim of the County aforesaid for fifty acres of land bearing date the 14th of October 1763. I therefore certify as Deputy surveyor under his Excellency Horatio Sharpe Esquire Governor of Maryland that I have carefully surveyed and laid out for and in the name of him the said Alexander Trim all that tract of land called Grims Fancy lying in the County aforesaid beginning at a bounded Black Oak tree standing on the north side of the Main Road that leads from Frederick Town to Swearingen's Ferry and near to John Foxes House on the West side of the South Mountain and running thence

Line North Degrees Length
No. South East or West
1 S West 63 36 perches
2 S East 18 40 perches
3 S East 77 58 perches
4 S East 48 20 perches
5 N East 60 80 perches
6 N 25 perches
7 then with a straight line to the beginning tree Containing and now laid out for fifty acres of Land to be held of Conegocheigue Manor Surveyed the 27th of February 1764. John Murdock
June 5th 1765 Examined & Passed}
U. Scott Exr.}
On the back of the aforegoing Certificate was the following Receipt VIZ I have received two pounds one shilling for the within improvement & eleven Shillings & two pence for rents to Mich? 1769 Patent may therefore issue with his Excly approbation June 12th 1769 Danl of St. Thos. Jenifer
Approved Robt. Eden