118. Documentation for Jeremiah Yeakel
(09 April 1736 to 10 February 1818)
father of Anna Yeakel
(20 October 1780 to 17 July 1840)


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Jeremiah Yeakel was born 09 April 1736 in Macungie, Bucks County, Pennsylvania.(1) He died 10 February 1818 in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.(2) The parents of Jeremiah Yeakel were Hans Heinrich Jäckel and his wife, Susanna (Heydrick) Jäckel.(3)

The story of the Yeakel family is told in The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737.
(4) The book's author, Samuel Kriebel Brecht, employed a numbering system in his book to more easily identify the descendants of one of the emigrants. The Schwenkfelder emigrants, those who arrived in Pennsylvania in the years 1731 to 1737, are designed with the letter "E".(5) Hans Heinrich Jäckel [E 45] was born 19 February 1708, was baptized 20 February 1708, and died 21 December 1781.(6) His wife, Susanna Heydrick [E 126], was born 19 September 1710 and died 23 September 1793.(7)

Hans Heinrich Jäckel [E 45], his wife Susanna (Heydrick) Jäckel [E 126], and his father, David Jäckel [E 38], landed at the port of Philadelphia in 1734, and thus are included in
The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families.(8) The wife of David Jäckel died before the family left Europe for America.(9) The Jäckels were included in the third and main migration. "The third and main migration began Tuesday, April 20, 1734, when the first family left Berthelsdorf. The emigrants embarked on the Elbe for Altona, Denmark, on April 28, and on May 20 reached their destination. On June 21 they embarked on the ship St. Andrew, and on July 29, Plymouth was reached. Land of the new world was first seen by them on September 17, and on September 22 actual landing took place."(10)

"Hans Heinrich (John) Yeakel (Jäckel) [E 45, F 38, F 38-5, wife E 126] acquired by warrant and survey of the year 1740, 100 acres in present Upper Macungie Twp., Lehigh Co. [Plate B IV], which he conveyed to John Fogel in 1769, to whom patent was issued in 1782. In 1743 he purchased of Philip Labar, 200 acres in present Marlborough Twp., Montg. Co. [Plate D II, owned in part in 1920 by Milton Hillegass], to which he later added 34 acres, of which he sold part to Philip Reed in 1759, and the remainder to George Roth in 1770. He for a time held part of the Christopher Newman tract [Plate D III]. He bought in 1755, 89 ½ acres in Upper Hanover Twp., near his 200-acre tract, which he sold in 1761 to Leonard Thomas. On Dec. 23, 1761, he as "John Yeakle of Marlborough," bought the Hamilton tract of 500 acres, partly in Upper Hanover Twp., Montg. Co., and partly in Upper Milford, Lehigh Co. [Placte C III], which he conveyed in four parts of equal area to his four sons, Balthasar [E 127], Jeremiah, George and Melchior. A survey of Dec., 1773, shows that he also bought 198 acres of Dietrich Welker in Lower Milford Twp., Bucks Co. Place of burial of Hans Heinrich, Yeakel Private Burying Ground, Hosensack; his wife, Hosensack."
(11)

The numbering system used in the Schwenkfelder Families allows one to easily follow the descendants of the earliest ancestor. David Jäckel is number [38] and all of his descendants listed in the Schwenkfelder Families are numbered beginning with [38]. Hans Heinrich Jäckel is number [38-5] and Jeremiah Yeakel is [38-17].
(12)

"The two most highly prized relics reposing in the Schwenkfelder Historical Library at Pennsburg (PA) are the original Ship List of the St. Andrew and the German Bible used by Caspar Schwenckfeld which contains his autograph and also marginal notes in his own handwriting."
(13) See APPENDIX A for a brief discussion of Schwenkfelder History as described on the website of the Palm Schwenkfelder Church.

Jeremiah Yeakel and Susanna Wiegner [38-17] were married 16 June 1763 by Reverend Balzer Hoffman in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.
(14) Susanna Wiegner was born 05 August 1740 in Towamencin County, Pennsylvania.(15) She was the daughter of Christopher Wiegner (Junior) [E 56] and Anna Schultz [E 150].(16) She died 12 June 1821 in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.(17)

Susanna Seibt Wiegner [E 154] was the mother of Christopher Wiegner (Junior) [E 56].
(18) Susanna Seibt married Christopher Wiegner (Senior) of Langneundord [Harpersdorf Church Book] on 02 June 1711. Christopher Wiegner (Senior) died prior to the migration to Pennsylvania.(19)

Jeremias Jäckel (Yeakel) signed the Oath of Allegiance on 02 June 1778 in Northampton County, Pennsylvania.
(20) Jeremiah served as a Private in the Northampton County, Pennsylvania Militia, under Captain John Jacoby.(21) John Jacoby was the Captain of the 2nd Company of the Upper Milford Township, Northamption County, Pennsylvania Militia, in 1780 and of the 8th Company in 1783.(22)

Anna Yeakel was born 20 October 1780 in Hoseneck Valley, Pennsylvania.
(23) She died 17 July 1840 in Centerville Township, Montgomery County, Ohio.(24) Anna Yeakel married Michael Hillegas in 1798 in Hoseneck Valley, Pennsylvania.(25)

Jeremiah Yeakel lived in Upper Milford Township, Lehigh County, at the time of his death.
(26) John Yeakel was the administrator of the Jeremiah Yeakel estate.(27) The accounting for the Jeremiah Yeakel estate was filed on 27 March 1820.(28)

Jeremiah and Susanna (Heydrick) Yeakel were the parents of eight children:
(29)

a. Salome, born 27 April 1764; died 15 April 1847, married Benjamin Anders

b. Lydia, born 4 March 1766, died 8 February 1838, married Jacob Kriebel

c. Catharine, born 11 June 1768, died 11 May 1836, unmarried.
(30)

d. Maria, born 22 August 1770, died 18 July 1827, unmarried

e. Helena, born 29 September 1772, died 19 November 1859.

f. John, born 15 November 1774, died 17 March 1825, married 1st Susanna Fisher, 2nd Mary Fisher, 3rd Susanna Huff.

g. Rosina, born 10 June 1777, died 18 August 1860, married Henry Wieand

h. Anna, born 20 October 1780, died 17 July 1840, married Michael Hillegass

Jeremiah Jackle (Yeakel) of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania, was naturalized 25 September 1751.
(31) Jeremiah Jäckel is probably buried at the Hosensack Schwenkfelder Cemetery in Palm Township, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania. His tombstone inscription states "Age 82 Yrs. 10 Mos. & 1 Day".(32)

The name of Michael Hillegas, husband of Anna Yeakel, appears in the Jeremiah Yeakel estate papers. Michael received money from the estate, apparently as payment to his wife. The husbands of other daughters of Jeremiah Yeakel are also listed as receiving money from the estate. "The following persons have received and have given receipts to Jemias Yeakel for a part of his inheritance or ?service? in advance as follows: Michael Hillegas $253.33."
(33)

Jeremiah Yeackel appears in the 1772 tax list for Northampton County.
(34) Jeremiah Yeakel appears on the 1781 Tax and Exoneration list.(35) Jeremiah Joekel appears on the 1798 Pennsylvania Tax List.(36) Jeremiah Yeakel was appointed as a Guardian for one of his sisters according to an 1805 Court Proceeding.(37)

According to D.A.R. National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch for Jeremiah Yeakle (Yeakel):
(38)

a. Macungie Township was settled before 1719. Now in Lehigh County, formerly Northampton – Hottenstein & Welch, Inc. dates for PA Municipalities, page 84.

b. Northampton Co. formed from Bucks Co. – 11 March 1751/2 - *Long, PA. Atlas of Hist. Co. Bound's, page 156

c. Bucks Co. formed 1682 - *Long, page 36

d. Lehigh Co. formed 6 March 1812 from Northampton Co. – Humphrey, PA Research: Co. & Twp Rec's, page 179

Children (
Yeakel) born in Pennsylvania:
i. Salome, born 27 April 1764
ii. Lydia, born 4 March 1766 – double check
iii. Catharine, born 11 June 1768
iv. Maria, born 22 August 1770
v. Helena, born 29 September 1772
vi. John, born 15 November 1774
vii. Rosina, born 10 June 1777 – double check
viii. Anna, born 20 October 1780 – double check


ORIGINAL SOURCE MATERIAL to support the RELATIONSHIP between
JEREMIAH YEAKEL and his daughter ANNA YEAKEL

1) Jeremiah Yeakel was born 9 April 1736 and died 10 February 1818. The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families, edited by Samuel Kriebel Brecht, Rand McNally & Company, 1923, page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel. See Appendix A for a discussion of Schwenkfelder History.


2) Jeremiah Yeakel (Jackle) of Philadelphia County, Pennsylvania was naturalized 25 September 1751. Pennsylvania Archives, 2nd Series – Military and Church Records, Volume II, Part 2 – Persons Naturalized in Pennsylvania, page 385.

3) Susanna Wiegner was born 5 August 1740 and died 12 June 1821. She married Jeremiah Yeakel. The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families, edited by Samuel Kriebel Brecht, Rand McNally & Company, 1923, page 1226, [38-17] Susanna Wiegner.

4) Jeremiah married Susanna Weigner on 16 June 1763 by Reverend Balzer Hoffman in Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families, edited by Samuel Kriebel Brecht, Rand McNally & Company, 1923, page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel.

5) Anna Yeakel was born 20 October 1780 and died 17 July 1840. She married Michael Hillegass Junior. The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families, edited by Samuel Kriebel Brecht, Rand McNally & Company, 1923, page 471, [38-35] Anna Yeakel.

6) Anna Yeakel married Michael Hillegas. (History of Allen County, Indiana with Illustrations and Biographical Sketches, (Kingman Brothers, Chicago, 1880), page 169, Hillegass Family.)

7) Anna Yeakel Hillegas and her husband, Michael Hilligass Junior, are buried in the Gebhart or St. John's Cemetery in Miamisburg, Ohio. Her tombstone reads, "Anna wife if Michael Hilligass died July 17, 1840 aged 56 Ys. 8m. 17 D." The tombstone date of birth does not agree with the birth date given in The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families for Anna.

8) Michael Hillegas Junior was baptized 15 November 1775 by J. T. Faber of the Great Swamp Reformed Church in present-day Zionsville, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania. Pennsylvania German Church Records of Births, Baptisms, Marriages, Burials, Etc., Clearfield Publishing, Volume III, page 177. This date of birth agrees with the date of birth as indicated on the tombstone of Michael Hilligas as the Gebhart or St. John's Cemetery in Miamisburg, Ohio.

9)
Jeremiah Yeakel lived in Upper Milford Township, Lehigh County, at the time of his death. Jeremiah Yeakel Estate Papers, File Number 211-325, Case 243, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, 1818. Jeremiah Yeakel letters of administration proceedings, will docket, volume 1, page 189, 23 February 1818, file 243, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania.

10)
Michael Hillegas Junior received $253.33 as a distribution to the heirs of Jeremiah Yeakel. Money distributed by the estate of Jeremiah Yeakel was paid to the husbands of the married daughters of Jeremiah Yeakel. Jeremiah Yeakel Estate Papers, File Number 211-325, Case 243, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, 1818.

11) John L Fox married Susannah Hilligas, daughter of Michael and Anna (Weikel) Hilligas. (The Fox Genealogy including the Metherd, Benner, and Leiter descendants, giving biographies of the first and second generations, with sketches of the third generation, compiled by Daniel Gebhart Fox, 1914. (n.p) 1924. 1 p. 1., (5)-172 p. 20 com. 37-9439 CS71.F79 1924 Library of Congress, page 94, Sketch of John L Fox.)

12) The marriage record for John L Fox and Susannah Hillegass includes a notation, "her father Michael Hillegass." Ohio County Marriages, 1774-1993. Date appears to be 1st November 1845. The Fox Genealogy states the date of marriage was 11 November 1845.



REFERENCES


1) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel and page 475, [38-35] Anna Yeakel. Also see, Daughters of the American Revolution, Ancestor #A129524, Jeremiah Yeakel, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch. Also see, (Rev.) Reuben Kriebel, Genealogical Record of the Descendants of the Schwenkfelders, who arrived in Pennsylvania in 1733, 1734, 1736, 1737 from the German of the Rev. Balthasar Heebner, and from other sources (Manayunk, Pa.: Josephes Yerkel, 1879).

2) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel and page 475, [38-35] Anna Yeakel. Also see, Daughters of the American Revolution, Ancestor #A129524, Jeremiah Yeakel, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch.

3) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 468, [38-5] Hans Heinrich Jäckel [E 45].

4) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923).

5) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page xvii.

6) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), Hans Heinrich Jäckel [E 45], page 466 and 468. Also see The Hans Heinrich Yeakel Cemetery, Plate 53, immediately after page 436.

7) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), [38-5] Hans Heinrich Jäckel [E 45], pages 466 and 468.

8) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), [38] David Jäckel [E 38], page 466 and Third Migration Lists, pages 36 and 38. See Plate 8, Complete Ship List of the Saint Andrew, Sept. 12, 1734, second page after page 68.

9) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), [38] David Jäckel [E 38], page 466.
10) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 36.

11) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), pages 72 and 73.

12) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page xvii.

13) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 28.

14) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel and page 475, [38-35] Anna Yeakel.

15) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 1226, [154-1] Christopher Wiegner [E 56] and Susanna [38-17], Dates from fly-leaf of book in Schwenkfelder Historical Library – Sammelband XXI.

16) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 1226, [154-1] Christopher Wiegner [E 56] and Susanna [38-17].

17) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel.

18) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 1226, [154-1] Christopher Wiegner [E 56] and Susanna [38-17].

19) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 1226, [154-1] Christopher Wiegner [E 56] and Susanna [38-17].

20) An alphabetized listing of those subscribers to the Oaths of Allegiance, Northampton County, Pa., 1777-1784: (also Oaths of Office, 1789-1804), Gaylord Griffiths, Closson Press, Apollo, PA, page 34: Name – Jackel, Jeremias, No. – ___, Date – 2 June 1778, Justice of Peace – Frederich Limbach, Page – 53. Also see, Henry F. Marx, ed., Oaths of Allegiance of Northampton Co., PA 1777-1784.

21) Pennsylvania Archives, 5th Series, Volume 8, edited by Thomas Lynch Montgomery, Harrisburg, PA, page 50. See Daughters of the American Revolution National Membership Numbers 705892, 840151, 848677, and 813936, which claim membership as descendants of Jeremiah Yeakel through his daughter Ann Yeakel and her husband, Michael Hillegas.

22) Pennsylvania Historical and Museum Commission website, Northampton County Revolutionary War Militia.

23) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel. Also see, Daughters of the American Revolution, Jeremiah Yeakel, Ancestor #A129524, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch, through Michael Hillegas Junior and his wife, Anna Yeakel.

24) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel. Also see, Daughters of the American Revolution, Jeremiah Yeakel, Ancestor #A129524, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch, through Michael Hillegas Junior and his wife, Anna Yeakel.

25) Daughters of the American Revolution, Jeremiah Yeakel, Ancestor #A129524, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch, through Michael Hillegas Junior and his wife, Anna Yeakel.

26) Jeremiah Yeakel Estate Papers, File Number 211-325, Case 243, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, 1818. Jeremiah Yeakel letters of administration proceedings, will docket, volume 1, page 189, 23 February 1818, file 243.

27) Jeremiah Yeakel letters of administration proceedings, will docket, volume 1, page 189, 23 February 1818, file 243.

28) Jeremiah Yeakel estate accounting filed 27 March 1820, file 243.

29) Samuel Kriebel Brecht, editor, The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families: Seekers of Religious Liberty Who Fled from Silesia to Saxony and thence to Pennsylvania in the Years 1731 to 1737. (Pennsburg, Pa.: Rand McNally & Company, 1923), page 471, [38-17] Jeremiah Yeakel. Also see, Daughters of the American Revolution, Ancestor #A129524, Jeremiah Yeakel, member National Number 359825, Lois Dodd Cornelius.

30) The Genealogical Record of the Schwenkfelder Families indicates Catharine, born 11 June 1768, died 11 May 1836, was "unmarried." An entry in Pennsylvania German Church Records of Births, Baptisms, Marriages, Burials, Etc., Clearfield Publishing, Church Records of Goshenhoppen, Volume 3, page 97, indicates Catharine may have been married in 1784 when she was 16 years old. "List of the Persons who were united in marriage by me, Fridrich Wilhelm Von der Sloot, July 13, Conrad Wolf, son of Conrad Wolf, of Upper Milford township and Catharina Jäkels, daughter of Jeremias Jäkel, of Upper Milford township."

31) Pennsylvania Archives, 2nd Series – Military and Church Records, Volume II, Part 2 – Persons Naturalized in Pennsylvania, page 385.

32) Hosensack Schwenkfelder Cemetery, Hosensack and Yeakel Roads, Upper Hanover Township, Montgomery County, PA. At the corner of Route 29 and Hosensack Road outside Palm village, turn north onto Hosensack Road and go about 1.1 miles. Note that Hosensack Road turns right at intersecton with Treichler Road and left again 0.7 mi from Route 29. The Hosensack meeting house and cemetery are on the left.

33) Jeremiah Yeakel Estate Papers, File Number 211-325, Case 243, Lehigh County, Pennsylvania, 1818.

34) Pennsylvania Compiled Census and Census Substitutes Index, 1772-1890, Jeremiah Yeackel, Upper Milford Township, Northampton County, Pennsylvania, 1772, page 009, database – PA 1772 Northampton Co., Tax List.

35) Pennsylvania Tax and Exoneration, 1768-1801, Upper Milford Township, Northampton, Archive Rollname 331.

36) Jeremiah Joekel, Pennsylvania, U.S. Dirct Tax Lists, 1798, Northampton and Wayne County, Upper Milford.

37) Jeremiah Yeakel, Pennsylvania Wills and Probate Records, 1683-1993, Berks County, Pennsylvania, 1805, Index to Appointments and Discharges Index to Miscellaneous Court Proceedings Index to Real Estate.

38) Daughters of the American Revolution, Jeremiah Yeakle (Yeakel), Ancestor #A129524, member National Number 813936, Judith Lee Chapman Frisch, through Michael Hillegas Junior and his wife, Anna Yeakel.


APPENDIX A

SCHWENKFELDER HISTORY


[The following passages are quoted from the website of the Palm Schwenkfelder Church. Physical address: 833 Gravel Pike, Palm, Pennsylvania 18070]

Caspar Schwenckfeld lived from 1489 to 1561. He was born into a family of nobility in Silesia (now part of Poland), was raised Roman Catholic, and was educated to be a diplomat in the European courts. He was a court advisor in Silesia in 1517 when Martin Luther posted his Ninety-Five Theses in Wittenberg, triggering the Protestant Reformation. Schwenckfeld was immediately attracted to the Reformation movement. He believed that the old world was passing away and a new world was appearing on the scene. He soon abandoned his affairs of state, and gave his full attention to studying the Scriptures and early church writings.

Schwenckfeld’s followers did not attend the established, dogmatic churches of the day. Instead, they conducted Christian worship in their homes, guided by Schwenckfeld’s writings. (Most people did not own Bibles at that time.) Schwenckfeld’s followers also participated in the Stillstand. The established churches deemed them un-churched heretical people and had fines and imprisonment imposed on them. Persecution throughout the 17th century reduced their numbers until, in 1719, the Austrian Emperor established a Jesuit mission to bring them back into the Catholic Church. Representatives of the Schwenkfelders traveled to Vienna to plead for religious tolerance but their pleas were futile. By 1726, only one alternative remained… to leave everything and escape.

In 1726, the most ardent of Schwenckfeld’s followers left their homes and began a migration to America. The largest group, numbering 171, landed in Philadelphia on September 22, 1734, on the sailing ship “St. Andrew.” On September 24, they held a service of thanksgiving to God for their deliverance from persecution and safe arrival in the New World. They also shared a simple meal together. There is no documentation of what was served at the meal but Schwenkfelder tradition tells us that it included bread, butter and apple butter. Schwenkfelders have held a Day of Remembrance service every year since then, making this the oldest continuous thanksgiving observance in the country.

Early Schwenkfelders held worship services and religious instruction in their homes for almost 50 years after their arrival in Pennsylvania. Initially, they had no fixed places or times of worship but, in 1762, they instituted a system of religious meetings. The meetings were held in private homes selected for that purpose on a predetermined schedule of rotation. This simple structure for worship met their needs for another 20 years until 1782, when they formed the “Society of Schwenkfelders.” This organization was incorporated in 1909 as “The Schwenkfelder Church.” The Schwenkfelder Church grew to include six congregations at its peak, with four remaining today. All of them were within a 50-mile radius of Philadelphia. Today’s congregations are located in Palm, Worcester, East Norriton, and Philadelphia.

Early Schwenkfelders established homesteads from Chestnut Hill, near Philadelphia, to what are now Berks and Lehigh Counties. However, most of them settled in Central and Upper Montgomery County. Schwenkfelders referred to the area covering Upper Montgomery, Berks and Lehigh Counties as the “Upper District.”

Schwenkfelders have historically been interested in education. They built the first log school in the Upper District near Hereford in 1765 and, soon thereafter, rented a structure for a school in the Hosensack area. Other school sessions in this district were held in private homes. In 1790, a combination school and meeting house was erected at Hosensack to replace the earlier facility. The first worship service was held in this building in August, 1790. This log school and meeting house was replaced by one of stone in 1838. The building was remodeled in 1893, and it remains to this day.

A second Schwenkfelder meeting house was built in Washington Township, Berks County, in 1791. The first services to be held in this meeting house were the Day of Remembrance services of September 24, 1791. Public school sessions were conducted by the Schwenkfelders in this building until 1824, when it was replaced by a more modern structure. This building was removed in 1911, and a granite monument was placed on the site.